I'm the Iceberg

awkwardsituationist:

four examples of deap sea bioluminescence in a sea worm and three comb jellies (ctenophores), known 1-4 as: tomopteris; mnemiopsis leidyi; beroe forskalii; lampocteis cruentiventer. from the IMAX documentary ‘into the deep’

Such incredible creatures (ノ゚0゚)ノ

paleoillustration:

Araripesuchus wegeneri and Kaprosuchus saharicus by Todd Marshall

Reblogging these beautiful crocodyliforms again because WOW JUST LOOK AT THEM, I AM IN LOOOOVE AHHHHHHH

rhamphotheca:

earth-swagger:
Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dandrolagus goodfellowi), Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, Queensland, Australia

There are ten known species of tree kangaroo.  These animals are capable of leaping up to thirty feet between trees, and can jump from a height of sixty feet to the ground with ease.
(by whoops vision)


Oh wow wow wow

rhamphotheca:

earth-swagger:

Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dandrolagus goodfellowi), Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, Queensland, Australia

There are ten known species of tree kangaroo.  These animals are capable of leaping up to thirty feet between trees, and can jump from a height of sixty feet to the ground with ease.

(by whoops vision)

Oh wow wow wow

Diadophis punctatus, commonly known as the ringneck snake or ring-necked snake, is a species of colubrid snake. It is found throughout much of the United States, central Mexico, and south eastern Canada. Ring-necked snakes are secretive, nocturnal snakes that are rarely seen during the day time. They are slightly venomous but their non-aggressive nature and small rear-facing fangs pose little threat to humans who wish to handle them. They are best known for their unique defense posture of curling up their tails exposing their bright red-orange posterior, ventral surface when threatened.

Dorsal coloration is solid olive, brown, bluish gray to black, broken only by a distinct yellow, red, or yellow-orange neck band. Head coloration tends to be slightly darker than the rest of the body with tendencies to be blacker than grey or olive. Ventrally the snakes exhibit a yellow-orange to red coloration broken by crescent shaped black spots along the margins

Ring-necked snakes use a combination of constriction and envenomation to secure their prey. The snakes do not have a true venom gland, but they do have an analogous structure called the Duvernoy’s gland derived from the same tissue.

Ring-necked snakes first strike and then secure the prey using constriction. Next they maneuver their mouths forward ensuring that the last maxillary tooth punctures the skin allowing the venom to enter the prey’s tissue. Ring-necked snakes are rarely aggressive to larger predators suggesting that their venom evolved as a feeding strategy rather than a defense strategy. Rather than trying to bite a predator, the snake winds up its tail into a corkscrew, exposing the brightly colored belly.

Image sources: [1], [2], [3]

[Read more]

drueisms:

Wow Wednesday - Wasps that are smaller than amoebas
Thrips are tiny insects, typically just a millimetre in length. Some are barely half that size. If that’s how big the adults are, imagine how small a thrips’ egg must be. Now, consider that there are insects that lay their eggs inside the egg of a thrips.
That’s one of them in the image above – the wasp, Megaphragma mymaripenne. It’s pictured next to a Paramecium and an amoeba at the same scale. Even though both these creatures are made up of a single cell, the wasp – complete with eyes, brain, wings, muscles, guts and genitals – is actuallysmaller. At just 200 micrometres (a fifth of a millimetre), this wasp is the third smallest insect alive and a miracle of miniaturisation.
Polilov found that M.mymaripenne has one of the smallest nervous systems of any insect, consisting of just 7,400 neurons. For comparison, the common housefly has 340,000 and the honeybee has 850,000. And yet, with a hundred times fewer neurons, the wasp can fly, search for food, and find the right places to lay its eggs.
Click through to read more about this ridiculously awesome animal.

On top of that Polilov found that over 95 per cent of the wasps’s neurons don’t have a nucleus. The nucleus is the command centre of a cell, the structure that sits in the middle and hoards a precious cache of DNA. Without it, the neurons shouldn’t be able to replenish their vital supply of proteins. They shouldn’t work. Until now, intact neurons without a nucleus have never been described in the wild.
This is awesome.

drueisms:

Wow Wednesday - Wasps that are smaller than amoebas

Thrips are tiny insects, typically just a millimetre in length. Some are barely half that size. If that’s how big the adults are, imagine how small a thrips’ egg must be. Now, consider that there are insects that lay their eggs inside the egg of a thrips.

That’s one of them in the image above – the wasp, Megaphragma mymaripenne. It’s pictured next to a Paramecium and an amoeba at the same scale. Even though both these creatures are made up of a single cell, the wasp – complete with eyes, brain, wings, muscles, guts and genitals – is actuallysmaller. At just 200 micrometres (a fifth of a millimetre), this wasp is the third smallest insect alive and a miracle of miniaturisation.

Polilov found that M.mymaripenne has one of the smallest nervous systems of any insect, consisting of just 7,400 neurons. For comparison, the common housefly has 340,000 and the honeybee has 850,000. And yet, with a hundred times fewer neurons, the wasp can fly, search for food, and find the right places to lay its eggs.

Click through to read more about this ridiculously awesome animal.

On top of that Polilov found that over 95 per cent of the wasps’s neurons don’t have a nucleus. The nucleus is the command centre of a cell, the structure that sits in the middle and hoards a precious cache of DNA. Without it, the neurons shouldn’t be able to replenish their vital supply of proteins. They shouldn’t work. Until now, intact neurons without a nucleus have never been described in the wild.

This is awesome.

The Armadillo Lizard (Cordylus cataphractus) is a lizard endemic to desert areas of southern Africa. It is also known as the Typical Girdled Lizard, Armadillo Girdled Lizard, Golden Armadillo Lizard, and Armadillo Spiny-tailed Lizard.

The Armadillo Lizard possesses an uncommon antipredator adaptation, in which it takes its tail in its mouth and rolls into a ball when frightened. In this shape it is protected from predators by the thick, squarish scales along its back and the spines on its tail. This behavior, which resembles that of the mammalian armadillo, gives it its English common name. This behavior may have inspired tales of the mythical creature Ouroboros.

rhamphotheca:

Malagasy or Striped civet (Fossa fossana)

… also known as the fanaloka, is a rare euplerid endemic to Madagascar. It should not be confused with the fossa (common name), a similar animal also endemic to Madagascar, which has the scientific name Cryptoprocta ferox. Nor is it the same as the related—and similarly named—Malagasy carnivore the falanouc, which is also a euplerine.

It is a small mammal: about 47 cm excluding the tail (which is only about 20 cm) and 2.5 kg. It has the appearance and movements of a small fox. The sources disagree over whether its claws are retractile. It has no anal glands, unlike other civets. It is endemic to the tropical forests of Madagascar, and specifically can be found in the Madagascar dry deciduous forests.

Nocturnal, though sources disagree over whether it is solitary or, unusual among euplerids, lives in pairs. It is not a good climber and frequents ravines. It eats small vertebrates (mammals, reptiles, and amphibians), insects, and eggs stolen from birds’ nests…

(read more: Wikipedia)      

(images: T - unattributed; R - by Hectonichus; L - by Rbrausse)

Thanks dude, you’re the best :3

squeedge:

danhallett:

Hemikyptha marginata. Photos by Didier Descouens

Treehoppers are amazing.

bullshit-bullsharks:

This bloody mess of a Horned lizard (genus Phrynosoma) isn’t in pain from an attack. Chances are he was feeling extremely threatened, and unleashed a defense mechanism nobody would see coming. The first thing this reptile does when threatened, besides camouflaging anyway, is to stay completely still. If the predator proceeds approach, they’ll alternate between short bursts of running and abruptly stopping to confuse the attacker. If this isn’t successful, they’ll resort to swelling up a bit in size to appear larger and more ‘horned.’ If anything, it just makes them more intimidating and harder to swallow. When all else fails, they shock the threat by spurting blood out of their eyes. It’s a grotesque tactic caused by thin-walled, blood-filled spaces called sinuses found within their eye sockets. In case of emergency, they’ll cause blood pressure in their eyes to rise which, in turn, leads to the sinus walls breaking suddenly. Blood erupts from the eyes in a nicely aimed stream of crimson red, reaching up to 4 feet (1.2 meters). A distasteful chemical combined with multiple bursts of these streams is enough to deter any predator..Or unsuspecting human.

Photo credit: randomtruth