Larger than life but smaller than Godzilla

sdzsafaripark:

The Incredible Coati via ZOONOOZ

itscolossal:

These tiny shrimp-like crustaceans called ostracods have an incredible defense mechanism: when eaten by a translucent cardinalfish they release bioluminescent chemicals in an attempt to ILLUMINATE THE FISH FROM THE INSIDE. Not wanting to be eaten by predators itself, the cardinalfish immediately spits out the ostracod. [VIDEO]

earth-song:

This is a Eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)

earth-song:

This is a Eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)

chalkandwater:

The Brazilian pygmy gecko (Coleodactylus amazonicus) is so small that raindrops pose a serious threat. Luckily, its body is so light and its skin so hydrophobic that it can shake off any drops that might land on it. It can even walk on water. 

Life (2009)

arsanatomica:

The skull of the Chinese Water Deer is one of the most iconic skulls out there. 

Like many small Asian deer species, it does not have antlers. Instead the males fight each other with their extremely sharp tusks, slashing at rivals with downward head swings. 

When not actively shanking others, the tusks can be folded back slightly., so they don’t interfere with eating. 

awkwardsituationist:

four examples of deap sea bioluminescence in a sea worm and three comb jellies (ctenophores), known 1-4 as: tomopteris; mnemiopsis leidyi; beroe forskalii; lampocteis cruentiventer. from the IMAX documentary ‘into the deep’

Such incredible creatures (ノ゚0゚)ノ

paleoillustration:

Araripesuchus wegeneri and Kaprosuchus saharicus by Todd Marshall

Reblogging these beautiful crocodyliforms again because WOW JUST LOOK AT THEM, I AM IN LOOOOVE AHHHHHHH

rhamphotheca:

earth-swagger:
Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dandrolagus goodfellowi), Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, Queensland, Australia

There are ten known species of tree kangaroo.  These animals are capable of leaping up to thirty feet between trees, and can jump from a height of sixty feet to the ground with ease.
(by whoops vision)


Oh wow wow wow

rhamphotheca:

earth-swagger:

Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dandrolagus goodfellowi), Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary, Queensland, Australia

There are ten known species of tree kangaroo.  These animals are capable of leaping up to thirty feet between trees, and can jump from a height of sixty feet to the ground with ease.

(by whoops vision)

Oh wow wow wow

Diadophis punctatus, commonly known as the ringneck snake or ring-necked snake, is a species of colubrid snake. It is found throughout much of the United States, central Mexico, and south eastern Canada. Ring-necked snakes are secretive, nocturnal snakes that are rarely seen during the day time. They are slightly venomous but their non-aggressive nature and small rear-facing fangs pose little threat to humans who wish to handle them. They are best known for their unique defense posture of curling up their tails exposing their bright red-orange posterior, ventral surface when threatened.

Dorsal coloration is solid olive, brown, bluish gray to black, broken only by a distinct yellow, red, or yellow-orange neck band. Head coloration tends to be slightly darker than the rest of the body with tendencies to be blacker than grey or olive. Ventrally the snakes exhibit a yellow-orange to red coloration broken by crescent shaped black spots along the margins

Ring-necked snakes use a combination of constriction and envenomation to secure their prey. The snakes do not have a true venom gland, but they do have an analogous structure called the Duvernoy’s gland derived from the same tissue.

Ring-necked snakes first strike and then secure the prey using constriction. Next they maneuver their mouths forward ensuring that the last maxillary tooth punctures the skin allowing the venom to enter the prey’s tissue. Ring-necked snakes are rarely aggressive to larger predators suggesting that their venom evolved as a feeding strategy rather than a defense strategy. Rather than trying to bite a predator, the snake winds up its tail into a corkscrew, exposing the brightly colored belly.

Image sources: [1], [2], [3]

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